Nate Gilkes Feature Image-min

Sound On – Episode 4: Nate Gilkes

Join us as we sit with Nate Gilkes. A man with many hats. An educator, a father, and a passionate musician. We discuss how music has shaped his journey and some of the amazing projects he is working on.

*We apologise for the sound quality. We had a mishap with the files when upgrading one of our laptops. On the bright side, it really goes to show how important sound is 😉

Anika:

Hello, and welcome to our next episode of Sound On with the lovely Nate Gilkes. Hello.

Nate:

Hi.

Anika:

Now, before we get into it, I’m going to try and say all the many hats that you wear. And then you can suggest.

Nate:

All right, cool. How much time have we got?

Anika:

Yeah, I know. I’ll be here all day. So, artistic director of Marian Street Theater for Young People. Obviously a composer, a musician, educator. What am I missing? Father-

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right.

Anika:

… husband. All the hats. What else can you say?

Nate:

I’m a director, a film-maker, I guess. Film-maker, loosely. Sound production. Sometimes drummer, violinist.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah. Everything.

Nate:

Yeah. Quite a bit.

Anika:

So how do you keep that all meshed into one life?

Nate:

Well, I just try to… I don’t see any difference between all the things. I think that’s the issue. It’s just one big thing for me. So sometimes you’re at the front, sometimes you’re leading a group of young people in a workshop. Sometimes you’re playing the violin on someone’s track. Sometimes you’re filming. I think it’s just… I don’t really see that you have to… And I say that to our young people, you don’t have to choose. It’s all part of your practice.

Anika:

Yup. Yeah.

Nate:

Anyhow, that makes it hard sometimes because you’ve got to apply for grants and things and, “Oh, what am I actually doing?”

Anika:

Yes, how do I… Yeah, I understand.

Nate:

And people are like, “So what do you actually do?” That’s when, “I’m an actor. That’s what I do. That’s my thing.” Like that part of it is challenging. But then I don’t see any difference. There’s no difference. Sometimes you just…

Anika:

No, you’re a creative, in a nutshell.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right.

Anika:

And it’s like that gives you the freedom to go with what path you need at that time. So it doesn’t really need to be restrained.

Nate:

Never restrained.

Anika:

Yeah. And so talk to me about, well, your music background, firstly. What was your first instrument that you learned or was it singing?

Nate:

No, it was the piano actually.

Anika:

The piano?

Nate:

Yeah. Because I came from quite a musical family. My parents both work in the medical kind of area, but they sing every night in the choir. We kind of sing every night, different groups, they’ve got. They still do it.

Anika:

Yeah, that’s great.

Nate:

So, it’s great. So, we always have music around. But I started playing piano probably when I was four. And then, yup four.

Anika:

Were they teaching you first?

Nate:

No, no, we had a teacher.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

So actually, the teacher that taught my mum when she was young. So we sort of have this kind of strange intergenerational connection to our piano teacher. And so then she taught me all the way through to high school and so on.

Anika:

That’s crazy.

Nate:

Except, I did drop the piano.

Anika:

Yeah. Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

Because I did have violin going as well.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

So I sort of wanted to focus… I found it challenging at the time. I regret it actually a little bit. I found it quite challenging trying to get my hands around. It wasn’t very satisfying for a period of time when the violin was going at that point. So I just sort of kept that.

Anika:

Through school, was it?

Nate:

Yeah, through school.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

But then strangely came back to it because I started teaching… Because we were always singing in the choir as well. That was like a given. But after school I started teaching singing while I was at the the Con. And playing one finger along. And eventually, just sort of taught myself how to play the piano. I can’t really read the chart, the sheet music, but I can hear it [inaudible 00:03:41], and learning. And then, kind of just through that teaching started playing way more piano. And now I play mostly piano in Australia.

Anika:

Yeah. That’s interesting, so come full circle.

Nate:

Yeah, totally.

Anika:

Do you think that you were attracted to the violin because of the ear-trained component?

Nate:

I think so.

Anika:

Because there’s no frets, you need to rely more on your ear.

Nate:

Yeah, I think so. I also love playing with people in ensembles. And that was always a big part of what we did. And I think I remember that at a very early age. I just loved how the violin sort of sounded together and that string sound. Even being the thing it was after school. It wasn’t in school. It was outside of school.

Anika:

And you had sort of other people to bond with, with your music.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right. Exactly.

Anika:

That’s interesting because I felt that playing piano. I felt it was very… It was a solo venture and you’ve got to do all this hard work by yourself at home and you do the practice and you have your lesson with your teacher. And they show you and if they’re a good teacher, show you how to understand it. But then all the hard work’s done at home and all the practice, and that can be really tiring, especially as a kid. You’re like, “Well, this is boring. I want to go play. I just want it to work straight away.”

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right.

Anika:

And you get frustrated. But you’re not really playing with other musicians, especially when you’re that young.

Nate:

Totally. No.

Anika:

So, I can see why you’d be drawn to the whole social side.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right. And that was always the thing. And that’s what I loved more, the things outside of school than I did actual school. And I tried to do all those extracurricular things, chamber orchestra and orchestra and the band and the thing. And the choir and chamber choir. All the extra stuff was where I was way more interested.

Anika:

Yeah. Well, do you think that was because it seemed more fun? Like the way they taught it or the way they approached it, was more fun and interactive?

Nate:

Oh, I think it’s that thing about… The music education [inaudible 00:05:40] would have that kind of theoretical and historical base. And I still really think about that training through late high school, especially the kind of [inaudible 00:05:50] that set me up. But there was something about… You sort of hear it all the time. Oh, that music just gave me goosebumps. Or that thing. There was something about it, there was a moment when the music would just kind of… Like it was allowed to go in and you weren’t like looking at it from a kind of very outside perspective. But in those ensembles, it was actually allowed to kind of go in and do what it’s supposed to do. I think-

Anika:

You felt more emotion-

Nate:

… Oh, totally. [crosstalk 00:06:24]. I actually remember there was a few quite distinct moments, particularly playing a few pieces particularly that just change your perception of what the music is. And I felt like sometimes you spend a lot of time trying to work out what the technical thing is. You’re trying to work out… This is just an instrument. That’s just instruments of what you do. It’s not the thing, it’s actually the by-product of the thing. And so, I think-

Anika:

You can get so bogged down with learning to play the tool or use the tools, you forget the story behind it.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right.

Anika:

And what is the emotion you’re trying to present and listen to? Yeah.

Nate:

That’s right. I would rather hear somebody played just two chords really well, just beautifully and really listened to the sound of the piano and just let it fill the room or put it through a loop. Or whatever they kind of do. Just, that’s they’re trying to create a sound rather than trying to create an event. So I mean, yeah.

Anika:

Yeah. I guess there can be a lot of people that think it’s all about playing really fast and really technical.

Nate:

That’s right.

Anika:

And to me, it feels robotic, it lacks emotion. And they don’t seem to be having fun while they’re doing it.

Nate:

That’s right.

Anika:

Are you enjoying this? Or are you just [inaudible 00:07:53] you have to play it like this?

Nate:

Yeah.

Anika:

Yeah, that’s interesting.

Nate:

But I think that’s how rock and pop musicians think about it, because you don’t go, “Oh, I’d really like to play… I’d really like to sing this Bach Aria.” I’ve never heard anybody say like, “I sing in this band, but I’d really like to sing the Bach Aria.” Like you know that that’s your thing and you have a thing. You have a style and you have a sound and that’s what you play. And you do that really well. And then if you can only do four things, then that’s fine. That’s the things you do.

Anika:

Yeah, that’s fine. Yup. But you build a sort of brand around that too. I guess that’s what bands are kind of doing. They have their following, they have their set style and it also comes into fashion and-

Nate:

Oh, totally.

Anika:

… It’s more [inaudible 00:08:33]. Yeah. But there are so many pop songs that are really underrated because they have that sort of glossy finish on top, but when you strip it back and play the chords and sing the song, this is really powerful.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right.

Anika:

I think that’s why covers are so popular because when people do change the output of a song-

Nate:

That’s right. Totally.

Anika:

… you actually hear the emotions coming through.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right. Totally.

Anika:

Yeah, that’s cool. So your music education as a kid, you, I guess, enjoyed the ensemble work more so than the one-on-one setting?

Nate:

Yeah.

Anika:

Do you think it was a… You had your mum’s teacher teach you, do you think that the age difference was something that you weren’t able to connect with your teacher? Or did you still enjoy that? But maybe it didn’t click as well as the ensembles?

Nate:

I feel like the teacher needs to listen to what the student needs as well. Like there’s got to be a kind of… It’s as much about you doing your practice as it is about them listening to you. And I think that’s the thing I’ve only realized in the last few years. But, actually, it’s a two-way street in the studio and it needs to be.

Nate:

But I think in that scenario, because we had that over basically like a 50-year connection to that family and that teacher, and it was her house in Bexley, and we went. And we lived in [Turramurra 00:10:09]. So, you’d physically go from Turramurra to Bexley, and that was like an hour drive to go to your violin lesson. And it was a bit like… It sort of became that was also an event, you know?

Anika:

Yes, yeah.

Nate:

So, I don’t know if it was just about the technical, the learning the violin, but it was actually about maintaining this sort of long connection to a teacher, which is also a beautiful thing.

Anika:

It is. It’s rare to have someone at such a young age all the way through, because usually you chop and change teachers maybe three, four times throughout.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right. Totally.

Anika:

Based on if you move house, or you don’t click with them after a certain while. But yeah, it’s really interesting your point on the two-way street, because I think a lot of teachers approach music as they are the authority, they know what’s best, pedagogically speaking, and all this sort of thing. And I just think, okay, yeah, sure. You’ve got your skills, you know, what you need. There’s certain set criteria to establish with the kids, but also what are they into, what’s going to keep them engaged? And are they really into this style of music? Explore that, teach them about it, include them in that learning process so they actually… Why do I like that sound?

Nate:

That’s right.

Anika:

So they can understand it a bit better than just reading the sheet music and sort of copying it. So that they then want to be able to write the songs [inaudible 00:11:37] themselves. So they understand how it works-

Nate:

That’s right, the basic.

Anika:

… and why they’re drawn to it. Yeah.

Nate:

Totally.

Anika:

Yeah, well, that’s really important. So, I guess with your role now as artistic director… Because you’ve gone down the theater path and acting and directing, how has your background in music and sound sort of linked in that way, I guess, and influenced that? I mean, is it the performance aspect, storytelling, or…

Nate:

I think I initially came to it because I loved… I really wanted to find out… After I left the Con I’d worked with choirs, like community choirs a lot. I wanted to get more… And also, the local dramatic society during musical sort of theater. And there was just something about how actors thought about music that I really dug. So I didn’t really vibe theater.

Nate:

I mean, I was really frustrated in a way with, I guess, the kind of conservatory model of learning, where the score is presented to you and you have to learn the score. And, for me, it was sort of the other way around actually, I thought the score should actually reflect what I was doing. And they could be the same thing, I suppose, the same thing. But actually, that needs to reflect me doing it, not the other way around.

Nate:

And actors think about… Often they need kind of an empowering body to go into the music space. But they think impulsively. It’s about impulse and it’s about responding. It’s about listening. You’ve got a text of lines, but actually it’s about an exploration of something, which I really… I love that. That’s-

Anika:

And it’s up to them to make those words come to life.

Nate:

… Yeah, that’s right. Totally. And so I started to kind of gravitate more towards working with choristers and actors than I was working with orchestral musicians or… And I found that quite rigid. So I sort of just stumbled into theater really. And really my practice really sits… I mean, I don’t think there’s a good term for it. It’s kind of like the equivalent… Like dance theater does it really well, where it is dance, but it’s not ballet. And it’s theater but it’s not theater, but it’s sort of the music theater evokes a Broadway musical. So, I’m in the music theater business, but not in musicals.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Nate:

If that makes sense. So I sort of sit in the cracks of those two things.

Anika:

You’re meshing the two worlds together.

Nate:

Yeah.

Anika:

Yup, going down the Broadway path.

Nate:

Yeah, totally. And it’s a huge body of work internationally around that, like what that is. Which was sort of that really… Kind of had a bit in Australia. You get it at the festivals, you get it in the international festivals and Sydney Harbor. And you do get those works coming in that are kind of music based, but still in a theater kind of concept. So that’s sort of where it kind of led me because I didn’t really do either of those things. I could actually work on some really interesting, and it’s really taken me some great places.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

I’ve been all around the world, like on this strange kind of thing.

Anika:

Yeah. So I remember when we first met you were finishing up a Bee Gees tour.

Nate:

That’s right.

Anika:

Was that [crosstalk 00:15:04] taking on a bit of drama because you had to sort of… Were you imitating them or do you-

Nate:

Oh, yes.

Anika:

… Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Nate:

Well, it’s sort of funny because I both love and hate that thing. I was staying in a tribute band initially because I have three kids and when you have three kids, you really have to work. You have to work, [inaudible 00:15:25] in order to pay for them. [crosstalk 00:15:28]. That’s right, that’s right. So, this kind of gig came up when the girls was very young, which was… You’ve seen the band, I’ve probably done 300 shows with them over four years. And you sort of travel around and you play great gigs. And I love traveling and I love playing in small towns and I love… The people would turn out and seeing you would basically be a parent, you’re an actor and you play one of the Gibb brothers and you-

Anika:

That’s what I was thinking. Yeah, you are playing a character-

Nate:

That’s right. Totally.

Anika:

… Yeah. Was that pre getting into more theater or was that sort of-

Nate:

No, that was sort of… We had a struggling… Because I went to the Victorian College of the Arts in 2010. And then after a few years you start up and you get a little group of artists that go with you, but independent theater is really tough, in a good way. And I primarily work in works of scale. I love [inaudible 00:16:31] choir and orchestra and 10 actors and a thing on stage. I want to see something that’s really big and ambitious. And of course that’s quite challenging. The challenge of resourcing that kind of work is always present. And so, yeah, that gig kind of came up at a good time. You can go on the road in sort of in a strange movie of your own life when you’re on a tour.

Anika:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah.

Nate:

[crosstalk 00:17:03]. That’s it, yeah, that’s right. And it’s good. And you do the show. But it’s great because you can yield to what that is.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah. And get to explore Australia and travel around as well.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

I’ve been everywhere. [inaudible 00:17:18]. It’s awesome.

Anika:

Yeah, that’s awesome. So with your role, well with Marian Street Theater for Young People… Well, tell us a little bit about the theater itself and what you do and what the kids are doing. Because my understanding is that you do all age groups and really drum into them working collaboratively and storytelling and diving into their past as well and heritage. And then, I guess that’s probably how the Testament album sort of sprung. So, yeah, talk me through that.

Nate:

Yeah. So, Marian Street Theater for Young People is a 50-year old company and it used to inhabit the Marian Street Theater building in Killara, which is now closed, but the company still runs. They’re going to renovate the theater and that’s ongoing. Probably in a couple of years it will be back up and hopefully we’ll be back in there. And I actually taught at Marian Street Theater for Young People 20 years ago as musical theater, like just as a kind of casual teacher. And I wrote my first score for them actually being the music director and the composer, 2002, just at uni and it was sort of what you did and it was great because there’s kind of two arms to the company.

Nate:

There’s the production arm where you do a number of what has historically been children’s shows, pantomimes or fairy tales a couple of times a year. And then there’s a big workshop component. So we have like 30 classes a week. We’ve got 260 kids in a week. And then we run a big, 15 to 20 holiday workshops as well. And so that’s a big part of our project. We have 15 teaching artists and couple of full-time people. So it’s kind of big and small, we integrate… And that’s what I loved about-

Anika:

[inaudible 00:19:15].

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right. So, I guess part of my job is I always like to throw spanners in works and I like to create, excuse me, a few… Get some really interesting projects going. And I think there is a place for kind of the fairy tale story. I think that’s big, but there is also a huge other part to being creative and creative thinking and creative practice. And that’s kind of what my project is here, actually, to bring some of that… My cross-disciplinary thing into this theater company.

Anika:

Right. Yeah.

Nate:

So it’s good. And obviously you’re on, North Shore in Sydney, which has a particular demographic and group of people and it’s somehow we’re sort of outside a little bit of the arts kind of, rats out of the city and we’re not… We’re outside of Newtown in the Inner West [inaudible 00:20:11]. But actually, there’s a growing artistic community in Killara and here in North Ryde and Gordon and Lane Cove. And then, actually, it feels like artists have come back. And they’ve got a lot of experience and they’re around and it’s really great to feel that kind of move.

Nate:

Yeah, so my project is kind of bring some of that other… Not just have straight plays but actually to bring more music projects and more, I guess… Which is where Testament kind of came from. Testament was a big… It’s kind of hard to describe. Like this sounds great, what is it?

Anika:

Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

It’s basically a big, music/theater work. We had 15 young people from our school, our students, and they interviewed an elder from their family and also in the community. And from that interview, we wrote 12 songs song titles based on that thing. So it’s kind of an intergenerational conversation.

Anika:

Yup and then pulled stories out from each other to make the songs-

Nate:

Exactly right.

Anika:

… Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

So there’s a young person and an old person and they have a conversation and they record it. And then from that, we basically transcribe the whole conversation. And then we pulled… Like everybody talks in lyrics. People talk in lyrics all the time. You don’t have to do any work. Actually, you just put a square around what it is.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

So we made these beautiful songs and there’s so many stories that you don’t even know are there. There’s a beautiful, old lady who’s 85 who lives in [inaudible 00:21:57] who escaped the fascists in Italy in the Second World War and her town was bombed. And she has a memory of an experience of being a five-year old and having to hold the hand of her mother who’s running through a forest as their town is being bombed. You can’t even fathom and she’s just there in this cul-de-sac here in [inaudible 00:22:15]. And so, I wanted to put a spotlight on that and have young people facilitate it.

Nate:

And yeah, so they wrote songs, they composed the music as well. So, they composed all the music, they composed all the lyrics. Well, they arranged it, I guess. And then we set the whole thing to music with a full band, The Fremont Philharmonic Orchestra, and then we recorded it in studio. It’s amazing. With Kamahl and iOTA and Prinnie Stevens and Abby Dobson, Leonardo’s Bride. So, we just had this amazing group of artists come and work with the kids and people.

Anika:

Which would be so great for them.

Nate:

Oh, it was. It was so cool.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

And we just had the last, the sort of debriefing on Saturday for it. And it’s just the kind of level of connection to the project has been really kind of profound. It is. It really, really is.

Anika:

Yeah, it’s huge.

Nate:

And then we had a big, live event to launch the album early.

Anika:

So are they going to act it out as well?

Nate:

We’re going to make a theater show, we think. We think that’s the next stage. But basically we’ve written 12 songs. It’s a concept album in a way of Pink Floyd or Rick Wakeman. It’s really [crosstalk 00:23:24] epic. It’s huge. Because it sort of goes both from what is it like to be a person growing up with the expectations of the 21st century and then someone who’s in their 80s who has been 16 before. With those expectations about kind of what they wanted and what happened and why.

Nate:

And I think that conversation is really fascinating because young people, they’re so passionate about the world that they want to make and what the things around them, the environment and politics and society, and what kind of world they want to live in is. So, here is someone who has that lived experience and how that changed them. Or the other thing like [inaudible 00:24:13] she maybe didn’t get to have some of those choices because of the circumstances she was in, or the choice was actually different. She had to deal with very immediate day-to-day how do I survive things? Which we’re so lucky in Australia that we don’t.

Anika:

No. But then I guess the younger kids or the younger generation are more… I feel, are starting to be more political and wanting to push back and push for their rights. It’s their future.

Nate:

That’s right. Totally.

Anika:

So I think they’re starting to understand that the climate change and politics that’s going on, that it affects them. So yeah, I guess it gives them a bit of strength to speak up and-

Nate:

Yeah, and they should have a voice.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

They should have a say in that because it’s going to affect them. And I kind of wish I’d been a bit more aggressive about that when I was 15. Not aggressive, a bit more… I guess to have a say in actually rights to go into school. You just kind of do your thing. I guess that’s okay as well.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah. And figuring yourself out. Well, I know I thought my opinion didn’t matter.

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right. Totally.

Anika:

Which is sad. And I think it’s good when the young generation, [inaudible 00:25:29] does matter because it’s our future and we need to pave the way for future generations too.

Nate:

Totally. Yeah, I never put my hand up. You know when you had the guest speaker was in your school, and they said, “Do you have any questions?” I never would put my hand up.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

I really wish I had.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

So, for kids, if you’re listening-

Anika:

Put your hand up.

Nate:

… Have a say.

Anika:

Yeah, speak up.

Nate:

Even if you feel silly.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

It’s hard to do. It’s hard to do, but it’s…

Anika:

I think that ties in with music and theater and everything is having your voice and your say and expressing yourself through your music or through your acting or whatever production you’re doing. That’s the power of the arts is saying so much through your art. And it is open to interpretation as well-

Nate:

Yeah, that’s right.

Anika:

… but maybe some people feel like it’s easier to speak through their art than when you’re doing a protest or… Because it can start a movement itself.

Nate:

That’s right. Totally.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

I think our job has to be… And I think I’m borrowing this version. We have to make a lion’s roar, that’s our job.

Anika:

Yup, yup.

Nate:

It’s actually about something. It’s about what we care about. And it’s about saving that. [inaudible 00:26:47]. That’s our job as teachers, as facilitators to kind of say, here’s the key to do that.

Anika:

That’s the end goal. It’s not getting bogged down with the technical and that helps you use your voice. But at the end of the day you can be less technical and less polished. But if you tell your story so well, that’s what people gravitate to. And I think I prefer the unpolished anyway. That gives you more than if it’s perfect, a perfect production.

Nate:

That’s right. Totally. You want to see how the sausage is made.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

[inaudible 00:27:35].

Anika:

Yeah, that’s right. Well, it gives you insight and real feelings. It’s not sort of being revised too much.

Nate:

That’s right. Totally.

Anika:

It takes you away from it.

Nate:

Yeah.

Anika:

Well, we’ll definitely have to put links to the Testament album and all of that. We’ll put that-

Nate:

It’s on iTunes, Spotify [inaudible 00:27:53], everywhere.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah.

Nate:

Everywhere.

Anika:

Yeah, awesome.

Nate:

Yeah.

Anika:

Any other things coming up that we can plug for you?

Nate:

Oh, look, we’ve got the beginning of a work in development. It’s still very early days.

Anika:

Yup.

Nate:

But sort of building on that what kind of world young people want to grow up in. We’ve got a new work called the Red Dust, which we’re working on through next year.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

Which is about a young, Chinese, Australian teen who lives in a kind of futuristic Sydney where there’s red dust storms. Remember when there was a red dust storm in about 2009?

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

And Sydney was eerie and had this strange light. And it was all red and all this dust was blowing from the Central Desert. So Talia sort of has to deal with this kind of ever present storm. And she decides to walk to the Blue Mountains where she dances and the dust falls away and she saves the earth. So, it’s based on the Red Shoes by Hans Christian Andersen, you know the fairy tale?

Anika:

Yup, yup.

Nate:

And so that’ll be up songwriting the music for that and directing it. And then Nicole Lee is the writer. So we’re going to really amplify the Chinese community now in Gordon and Killara. That’s where we’re going next, so look out.

Anika:

Yeah. Yeah. Very good.

Nate:

October.

Anika:

October?

Nate:

Yeah.

Anika:

Lovely. Yeah. Well, thank you so much for coming on and chatting. It’s really cool to… Someone, that you’ve done so well in many different aspects of the arts, but you’re so grounded and that’s what I think. I really love because there’s a lot of ego sometimes in the arts, but I think that’s what makes you so good as an educator as well, because you can get onto the student’s level and understand what they’re going through and help bring it out of them in an artistic way and encourage people to speak up and push themselves and push with music, mashing the theater and yeah, that’s really great. And there needs to be more people like that.

Anika:

So yeah, really appreciate you coming on to chat. It’s great.

Nate:

Thanks. Thanks, so much. Keep going.

Anika:

Yeah.

Nate:

Everybody just keep going. Don’t stop.

Anika:

Don’t stop.

Nate:

If it’s for your art, just keep going.

Anika:

I know. That’s the hardest part. It’s like the practice can be boring but the prize is in the practice and beyond.

Nate:

Exactly.

Anika:

It’s like you get that understanding and then the freedom will come and then you can do whatever you want. You can play violin. You can [inaudible 00:30:19].

Nate:

Yeah, exactly.

Anika:

Yeah, yeah. Awesome. All right, thank you.

Nate:

Thanks.

 

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"My daughter absolutely loves attending her piano classes every week and always gets excited about new songs they learn."

Petra - Emma's Mum

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